Sub-Soil Trench Drain Repair Tips

subsoil trench drain

Sub-soil trenches are the best solution when it comes to repairing your sewer lines. Trench drains carry all of the wastewater from beneath your property and route it away from your foundation. They are typically made of a thick plastic and lined with PVC piping. Below the surface of the plastic, you will often find perforated or flexible piping that carries the wastewater away from your home, to the sewer system.

There are a number of benefits to using a sub-soil trench drain. First, they can extend the life of your sewer line by diverting excess water away from the house and back toward it. The trench drain also ensures that sewer smells good and isn’t deposited in your flower beds or in the driveway.

But what if your house has a large amount of household waste? How do you dispose of it properly? Fortunately, the answer is a simple one. Your sub-soil trench drain should have two drains: a garden pipe for regular yard debris, and another drainage system for cleaning up larger clogs. If you don’t have these two drains installed, chances are your lawn will become an environmental disaster.

A garden pipe is simply a long, narrow trench drain connected to the house by PVC pipe. The PVC pipes are buried a few feet below the ground, usually in the center of the yard. Digging a hole in your yard to install your sub-soil trench drain will require a permit, so always ask your local engineer before you make any repairs.

Another benefit of a sub-soil trench drain is that they are much easier to install than regular pipes. They don’t require digging, running trenches, or dealing with old, rotting pipes. A sub-soil trench drain is a simple and inexpensive solution for getting rid of yard waste.

Unfortunately, not every homeowner has a trench drain. In some cases, it’s just not possible. If your home doesn’t have a drainage system, you have the option of having a sub-soil trench drain installed. They are simple to install, and can be used in place of a standard yard sewer drain. They are made from flexible polyethylene and allow for a larger diameter than most conventional sewer lines, which means faster plowing and less chance of backed up drains.

After you have your drains in place, your main job is to keep them clean. Remove all large rocks or tree roots from your garden, and empty your yard of leaves and other debris. If your house is carpeted, sweep or vacuum the carpeting twice a week to get rid of any large dirt particles.

When your garden is bare, plant low-growing bushes or shrubs to frame your trench drain; water them regularly to encourage root growth, and remember to water them before you put mulch in the soil. Mulch acts as a natural waterproof and can help keep your sub-soil trench drain clean. When you add back to your yard, be sure to trim the extra tree limbs back from your house. It’s best to avoid using chemicals to kill or repel pests, and always follow instructions on the package of your sub-soil trench drain. If you are not sure what you are doing, please contact Pittsburgh Waterproofing.

After you’ve made it to the other side of your trench, remove all vegetation and cut any tree limbs back to keep them from growing back into place. Check your drainage system to make sure it’s properly connected to the street. If you are unsure, contact a local contractor to install a sub-soil trench drain for you. Cut a hole in the center of your trench, then place a flexible cable through it, running it alongside your main sewer line. This creates a new waterproof path through which water will flow, washing away sediment and trash, while cleaning up excess dirt. Any materials that you’re not interested in getting stuck in the trap will break loose as the trench drain empties.

In case your sub-soil trench drain isn’t powerful enough to deal with a full load of debris, you may need to dig a smaller trench, or install some type of garbage disposal unit. There are a variety of garbage disposal systems to choose from; see which one works best for your situation and then place the garbage disposal within the trench drain proper. Sewer pipes can be clogged by roots, and digging they would require a professional contractor. Make sure to always have enough water in your drainage system, and keep an eye on any leaks.

Finally, after you’ve cleaned up everything else, make sure to test your sub-soil trench drain again. This is to ensure that everything is running smoothly, and that no roots have managed to break through to the main drain. If you discover any clogs, use a high-pressure water jet to clear them out. By following these simple steps, you’ll be back in business before you know it!